Category Archives: Conservation

Why water for humans matters for gorillas…

virungas massif vista

The Virunga National Park: Home of the gorillas and under constant threat

Hi, this is Tuver,

Gorillas very rarely need to drink water. They usually get all the hydration they need from chewing on lush nettles or wild celery.

Humans, however, are another matter. We need water to survive and, with the number of people living around the Virunga National Park increasing all the time, pressure on the natural resources of the region is growing all the time.

And, just as poverty and hunger can force people from local communities to trespass into the National Park, placing themselves and the wildlife living here (including our wonderful gorillas!) at risk, so too can the need for water.

That’s why I recently attended a special meeting of the Greater Virunga Transboundary Commission (GVTC) in Gisenyi. Here, we learned from scientists that the World Health Organisation recommends that people should have access to at least 20 litres of water a day. This might sound a lot, but it’s estimated that the typical person living in Britain uses about 150 litres of water a day!

Right now, the majority of people living in the Virunga Massif do get the WHO’s minimum amount of water – but only just! However, this only tells half the story.

Perhaps the most important fact we learned at this meeting was that, while in Rwanda, most people are within 15 minutes’ walk of a water source, in DR Congo, 44 per cent of people need to walk for at least an hour to get the water they need to survive.

So, how does this affect the gorillas? Well, getting water takes time and effort. Quite simply, this means people have less time to invest in making money, while by only being able to access around 20 litres of water a day, many struggle to grow crops. And, sadly, this again means people feel they have little choice but to trespass into the Virunga National Park for food and other natural resources. As you probably know, trespassers can, at best, disturb the gorillas or, at worse, lay traps for bushmeat that can snare young gorillas, often with fatal consequences.

Again, the population of the region is only going to keep on growing, so we need to put our heads together to find a way of providing sufficient water without jeopardising the integrity of the National Park’s boundaries. The GTVC meeting, then, was used to launch a new study into the hydraulic potential of the Virunga Massif. Hopefully, by using the latest in exploration and extraction techniques, we can work together to ensure that humans get all the water they need to survive and even thrive, while their gorillas neighbours are left in peace in their forest homes!


It may not be as exciting as gorilla trekking, but meetings of the GVTC are just as important to ensure the long-term survival of our cousins in the forest


…And here we all are after another interesting and useful meeting – transboundary cooperation in conservation in action!


At last, transboundary conservation is formalised with a Treaty!


Here are all the representatives of the three states who came together to sign this historic and important agreement


Hi, this is Tuver,

The Treaty on the Greater Virunga Transboundary Collaboration of the Wildlife Conservation and Wild Flora and Tourism Development was signed on September 22 in Kinshasa at the end of the meeting of the Council of Ministers of the large cross-border collaboration in the Virungas region, and I was there to witness this important development.

The signing of this treaty was reached after ten long years of negotiations! The idea of all three countries (Rwanda, Uganda and DR Congo) coming together was inspired by the Kwitonda group of mountain gorillas. For years, they have been wandering between Rwanda and Congo, as have the Nyangezi family and many other individuals. As Dr Muamba Tshibasu, Executive Secretary of the cross-border collaboration scheme explained at this meeting, the gorillas need no visas and will just go where they want, so shouldn’t our efforts to protect them be similarly free from national boundaries?

Also in attendance on the big day were the Ambassadors of the Netherlands and Norway. They watched as the Treaty, which formalises the collaborative conservation efforts that have we have been carrying out for many years now. The Treaty also formalises our ongoing efforts to share the benefits of tourism and to work together to attract new tourists to the region, not only to see the gorillas, but to enjoy everything else the Virungas has to offer.

François Kanimba, Minister of Trade and Industry of the Republic of Rwanda welcomed the outcome of the process of formalization of cross-border cooperation through the signing of the Treaty and stressed that it is an important instrument for regional integration, which will significantly contribute to safeguarding the common heritage to the people of three countries of the Greater Virunga.

Meanwhile, the governor of North Kivu, Julien Paluku Kahongya, in an interview to the press, welcomed the outcome of the process leading to this signing, while the Minister of Tourism of the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Honorable Minister of Commerce and Industry of the Republic of Rwanda today signed the Treaty on the Greater Virunga Transboundary Collaboration of the Wildlife Conservation and Wild Flora and Tourism Development, which will be sent through diplomatic channels to signing their counterpart Honorable Minister of Tourism, Wildlife, Wild Flora and Antiquities of the Republic of Uganda.


Everyone was so happy that, after all these years of negotiations, we have finally signed this important Treaty

So, what does the Treaty guarantee? Without going into too much detail, it:

Recognizes the need to conserve transboundary protected areas through collaborative management for the benefit of present and future generations of the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Republic of Rwanda and the Republic of Uganda;

Is aware that the Central Albertine Rift which includes the Greater Virunga is one of the most biologically diverse ecological regions; precious and fragile the world, providing a healthy and safe except for rare and endangered wildlife and wild flora protection under national and international law

Affirms that States have sovereign rights over their wild flora and fauna and responsibility relating thereto retain and use those resources sustainably;

Reaffirms the need for cooperation among States in relation to the management of natural resources and development of tourism, information sharing on the conservation of fauna and flora, tourism and building national capacities

Additionally, the Transboundary Collaboration Framework Greater Virunga governed by this Treaty is based on the following guiding principles:

a) Respect for the sovereignty and territorial integrity of States Parties;

b) A status and equal treatment for all States Parties;

c) Poverty reduction and sustained improvements in living standards;

d) Sustainable development;

e) The participation of the community;

f) Decision-making based on surveys.

The objectives of the Greater Virunga Transboundary Collaboration are:

1) To promote and coordinate biodiversity conservation and other socio-cultural values ??within the network of protected areas of Greater Virunga mentioned in Article 3;

2) Developing strategies for transboundary management of biodiversity;

3) To promote and ensure harmonized planning as well as monitoring and evaluation of the implementation of cross-border programs of conservation and development;

4) Promote and coordinate tourism development programs in the Greater Virunga Landscape;

5) Ensuring sustainable financing for the management of the network of transboundary protected areas to promote the conservation of biodiversity and the development of tourism in the Greater Virunga Landscape;

6) Strengthen and harmonize the production and sharing of knowledge, experiences and best practices for good decision-making;

7) Promote and enhance natural resources and safety of tourists in the Greater Virunga Landscape;

8) Engaging in any other activity for achieving the objectives of the Treaty.

Regarding Obligations of Member States, the Treaty states:

a) Keep the fauna and the flora and develop sustainable tourism in Transboundary Protected Areas in relation to the jurisdiction of each State Party;

b) Take care and be responsible for migratory species at the time of their presence in the jurisdiction of each State Party;

c) Share information for the conservation of wildlife and tourism development in the Transboundary Protected Areas;

d) Participate in annual fees in connection with financial and other resources required for the implementation of this Treaty;

e) To adopt, wherever possible, common positions in respect of treaties, conventions, and regional and international agreements and other protocols related to this Treaty;

f) To appoint representatives to national implementation of this Treaty;

g) Participate in joint marketing of tourism, research, monitoring of flora and fauna, conservation and development of tourism as well as wildlife management initiatives and flora and other activities required to achieve the objectives of this Treaty.

The treaty specifies the bodies of the GVTC, the funding of the latter and reserves, the effects on other international laws and obligations without omitting the modalities of accession of new members. It comes into force ninety (90) days after the deposit of instruments of ratification by all States Parties.

So, this may not be the most exciting blog post I’ve written for you, but, I can certainly say it’s one of the most important. Plus, given the importance of cooperation in conservation, it’s one of the most exciting for myself and my colleagues. Improved cooperation will help ensure we channel as much energy as possible into safeguarding flora and fauna, including, of course, our wonderful gorillas, and that the efforts and the rewards and divided up fairly.


Getting official protection for Congo’s great apes

One of my latest visits to the gorillas at The Virungas National Park

One of my latest visits to my favourite gorilla family. We need to work together to protect these wonderful creatures!

Hi, this is Tuver,

Effective conservation is all about cooperation. No matter how hard we work, we conservationists would not achieve much without the support of the authorities or without being able to work with other NGOs and charities. This is especially true here in Congo, where poverty and insecurity combine with the usual bureaucracy and the associated challenges that come with running such a large country.

This is why I was so excited to attend a special awareness event held here in Goma just a few days ago. Organised by the Congolese Institute for the Conservation of Nature (ICCN) in partnership with other NGOs and with funding from the Arcus Foundation, the workshop was well attended and brought together the latest thinking on how civil society and governments can work together to protect great apes, not just here in Congo, but in all the ten countries where gorillas live in the wild.

The big highlight of the day was an informative lecture by Jean Claude Kyungu Kasolene. If you’ve been reading this blog for a while, you might remember that JC used to run our project at Mount Tshiaberimu and, while part of our team, he completed a Master’s degree in gorilla behaviour. So, he was the perfect choice to tell us all about the genetic differences between the four distinct types of gorilla and how things like their varied habitat and behaviour should influence how we approach our conservation efforts.

What’s more, we learned how, right across Africa, local communities are benefitting from the improved protection of great apes and other primates. We learned, for example, how the protection of monkeys along the southern part of the border between Nigeria and Cameroon has helped the forests there thrive, spelling good news for local people.

After the fascinating talk from JC, leading figures from the region pledged official support for ongoing efforts to protect both gorillas and chimpanzees. The Provincial Minster of the Environment for North Kivu, Anselme Kitakya, alongside the Vice-President of the Province, signed an agreement committing to the protection of flora and fauna, and in particular pledging to protect the habitat that serves as the last refuge of the great apes.

Now, we have to get busy ensuring the good words and followed up with action. Myself and the rest of the team here in Congo are busy rolling out our ambitious SafeZone project. This will see two million trees planted in order to create a safe space where gorillas can live free form human contact. But we must hurry! The rainy season starts in four weeks and we need to get all the saplings we have grown planted. Please help us if you can. Read more on the website here!

Until next time,


Speaking out about climate change and gorillas

Tuver talk pic 5

Here I am, on stage, talking about how climate change threatens both people and gorillas

Hi, this is Tuver,

If gorillas are to stand any chance of long-term survival, it’s the young generations whose help we need the most. So it was definitely very encouraging that I was invited to speak to university students in Goma as part of their World Environment Day celebrations.

The big day was centred on climate change and environmental education across the Great Lakes region, an area which includes Congo and which is home to the world’s last remaining mountain gorillas, as well as numerous other threatened species and, of course, some of the world’s most diverse and important ecosystems.

As you might expect, the theme of my talk was related to gorillas and their habitat. I wanted to show that the ongoing overuse of the natural resources found in the boundaries of the Virunga National Park has both immediate and long-term consequences. Right now, habitat loss, which is partly driven by the illegal market for fuel which people use in their homes, is one of the biggest threats facing gorillas living in the wild. Our cousins rely on the trees and plants for food and shelter and the destruction of their home places them in grave jeopardy.

At the same time, habitat loss here in Congo is also part of a wider problem. The destruction of forests right around the world is a leading cause of climate change. Over the past few years we’ve started to notice quite how a changing climate is affecting people in this part of Africa. Harvests are being disrupted and weather patterns are changing. Who knows what the next few years will bring if we don’t all act to stop climate change before it’s too late?

Thankfully, the warm reception I was given, and the interest of the young students showed me that all is not lost. Awareness of the dangers posed by climate change is on the rise here in eastern Congo and, as these students demonstrate, it’s not just us gorillas conservationists who are determined to take action. Let’s hope these inspiring young people go back to their home communities and explain how small changes can help save the forests, save the gorillas and even help save the planet.

Below are a few more pictures from this fascinating day. I hope you enjoy them!

Tuver talk pic 1  Tuver talk pic 3 Tuver talk pic 2

New trees bring new hope for gorillas and people…

Hi, this is Tuver ,

Last week I was invited to a tree planting ceremony at a community in Kalehe Territory, South Kivu. The community is one of many that borders the Kahuzi Biega National Park, one of the last refuges of the endangered eastern lowland gorilla.

Like most of the small towns and villages dotted throughout this part of DR Congo, for many years now, community members have had little choice but to go into the protected forest and cut down trees. They know this illegal and they are know that the ecosystem here is fragile and must be protected at all costs. However, with near-constant war cutting them off from the rest of the country and poverty widespread, most feel they have little choice but to take the risk and enter the forest in search of food and fuel.

Almost ten years ago now, the Gorilla Organization started working with these communities, helping them plant fast-growing trees they could use for firewood. These tress serve as a valuable buffer between gorillas and their cousins in the forest.

And our efforts continue. So far, we’ve planted around 160,000 trees on the borders of Kahuzi Biega National Park, and I just recently watched a few more go into the ground.

As you can see from the pictures I took, the whole village turned out to learn about why the trees are being planted. These pictures should also give you some idea of how much forest has been lost and how we are working to address this. And let’s not forget, more trees is not just good news for gorillas needing food and shelter! It’s also good news for humans, too, as we start to feel the effects of climate change here in Africa.

The whole village turned out to hear why we were planting more trees

The whole village turned out to hear why we were planting more trees

Here are some trees we planted just a short time ago...

Here are some trees we planted just a short time ago…

But as you can see, much of the forest has been cut down to use for farming

But as you can see, much of the forest has been cut down to use for farming

And here's me, checking out the fully-grown trees that help keep the gorillas safe

And here’s me, checking out the fully-grown trees that help keep the gorillas safe

The day a gorilla travelled by helicopter…

helicopter blog pic 1

Hi, this is Tuver,

It’s not often that you get to see a gorilla travelling by helicopter! But that’s exactly what I saw last week when the United Nations gave a lift to orphaned eastern lowland gorilla Ihirwe.

The young gorilla had been living in a special orphanage in Kinigi, Rwanda, for the past few years, after she was saved from smugglers who were planning on selling her as an exotic pet. Now, with the help of the UN, she has travelled to DR Congo, where she will live with a group of fellow gorilla orphans at the Gorilla Rehabilitation and Conservation Education (GRACE) Centre in Kasugho.

We all hope that, once she settles in to her new life, Ihirwe will get used to being with her own kind and learn how to be a gorilla again!

Here are some of the photos I took on that memorable day. As you can imagine, Ihirwe – whose name means ‘hope’ by the way – was more than a little nervous. However, the helicopter flight meant she was spared a gruelling day-long journey along bumpy roads. Plus, my colleagues at the GRACE centre have assured me she has got over her ordeal and is doing just fine.

helicopter blog pic 1

helicopter blog pic 3

helicopter blog pic 4

Video News from the Volcanoes National Park!

Hi, this is Tuver,

Screen shot 2013-10-24 at 16.31.47

Just recently, I travelled to the Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda to track mountain gorillas located there. On my tour I came across the Umubano family, which consists of 14 members and is led by the awesome alpha silverback Charles. The name Umubano is Kinyarwandan, which translated means neighborliness, and is the name of the other silverback in the group. He used to be in charge before Charles took over.

As you guys can see from this video the group is doing fine, spending their days grooming one another or playing around. Young gorillas are usually more active than their older companions, and like to wrestle, tumble and climb trees. They also develop much faster than human infants and begin to bounce and play at about 8 weeks.

I hope you guys enjoy the video I took and as usual I will keep you updated with the latest news on our gorillas here in Africa.

Keeping our gorillas safe and healthy!


Keeping a good distance between me and my friend!

Hi, this is Tuver,

A few couple of days ago I went to track gorillas at the Kahuzi-Biega National Park, which is located in the eastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The park currently holds 9 gorilla families of which 2 are open to tourists, who are always welcome at Kahuzi-Biega as the ongoing tourism aids the conservation of the low land gorillas that live here. However, there are a couple of things we have to consider when tracking them.

Our number one priority when visiting these great apes is to keep them safe and healthy by ensuring we keep the amount of pathogens spread between humans and animals to a minimum – just in case you were wondering why I was wearing a mask! This is also the reason why I kept a certain distance from the gorilla in the picture, as I was in fact following a rule called the 7-meter tracking regulation. This rule is very important as gorillas and humans are very closely related which means the chances of them catching diseases like influenza is very likely if we get in immediate contact with each other. Unfortunately, this is not always preventable as especially baby gorillas are always curious in getting to know tourists and trackers who come to visit them.


Eastern lowland gorilla at Kahuzi-Biega National Park


And now a trustee pops by Goma to say hello…

Paul meets with Henry at the Goma Resource Centre

Paul meets with DRC programmes manager Henry at the Goma Resource Centre

Hi, this is Tuver,

Just a few weeks after we had the honour of welcoming chairman Ian Redmond to this part of Africa, trustee Paul Baldwin and his wife also paid a visit, to see for themselves the work being done to protect gorillas and improve the lives of their human neighbours.

During their trip, the couple went to see mountain gorillas in the Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda – they even managed to see baby Iwacu, our adopted mountain gorilla – and they also visited a number of development projects there and in neighbouring Uganda. To finish off their mini tour of central Africa, Paul and Sarah crossed the border into DR Congo, where they visited the team here at the Goma Resource Centre.

As well as myself, the Baldwins met with Henry, the programmes manager for DR Congo, and together we discussed the current status of the programmes and how the money donated by generous supporters in the UK and elsewhere in the world is being put to good use transforming the lives of thousands of people and so easing the pressure being put on the gorillas’ forest home.

Here are a few pictures of their visit. If you’re visiting this part of Africa any time, we’d be happy to welcome you to the Resource Centre as well – just get in touch before you arrive!


Paul and Sarah talk gorillas and field projects with Henry

Celebrating as poachers give up their snares for good…

poachers pic

Hi, this is Sam,

As you are no doubt aware, poaching is one of the major threats facing Uganda’s gorillas today. Though nobody goes into the forest to harm mountain gorillas on purpose, younger gorillas in particular can get caught in snares left for small mammals, often with tragic results.

Ever since we started our work here at the Kisoro Resource Centre, we’ve recognised that the main thing causing people to become poaching is poverty. Men and women living alongside the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest often have no choice but to go into the protected area for bushmeat, as well as for firewood, either for their own families or to sell at market. That’s why we set up our sustainable agriculture programme, to give people the chance to make a living without having to depend on the resources found in the forest.

It’s been so rewarding watching people improve their own lives. But nothing has matched the excitement we felt when we succeeded in getting a group of former poachers to join the programme. While these men used to make a living out of illegally entering the forests to lay down snares, now they are learning how to live off the land.

To celebrate this exciting development, we held a special ceremony in Rubuguri County Hall. Here, the poachers handed over their snares to Pontius Ezuma, the head ranger for both the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest and the Mgahinga Gorilla National Park here in Uganda. Also present was Gideon Ahebwa, the President’s representative in this region, as well as a number of rangers and community members. As you can see from these pictures, it was a happy and exciting day for everyone involved.

We’re all confident that these men can succeed in transforming their lives, which would be good news not just for them, but for the gorillas who will, of course, have fewer poachers to worry about…

farmers pic 2