Category Archives: DRC

Speaking out about climate change and gorillas

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Here I am, on stage, talking about how climate change threatens both people and gorillas

Hi, this is Tuver,

If gorillas are to stand any chance of long-term survival, it’s the young generations whose help we need the most. So it was definitely very encouraging that I was invited to speak to university students in Goma as part of their World Environment Day celebrations.

The big day was centred on climate change and environmental education across the Great Lakes region, an area which includes Congo and which is home to the world’s last remaining mountain gorillas, as well as numerous other threatened species and, of course, some of the world’s most diverse and important ecosystems.

As you might expect, the theme of my talk was related to gorillas and their habitat. I wanted to show that the ongoing overuse of the natural resources found in the boundaries of the Virunga National Park has both immediate and long-term consequences. Right now, habitat loss, which is partly driven by the illegal market for fuel which people use in their homes, is one of the biggest threats facing gorillas living in the wild. Our cousins rely on the trees and plants for food and shelter and the destruction of their home places them in grave jeopardy.

At the same time, habitat loss here in Congo is also part of a wider problem. The destruction of forests right around the world is a leading cause of climate change. Over the past few years we’ve started to notice quite how a changing climate is affecting people in this part of Africa. Harvests are being disrupted and weather patterns are changing. Who knows what the next few years will bring if we don’t all act to stop climate change before it’s too late?

Thankfully, the warm reception I was given, and the interest of the young students showed me that all is not lost. Awareness of the dangers posed by climate change is on the rise here in eastern Congo and, as these students demonstrate, it’s not just us gorillas conservationists who are determined to take action. Let’s hope these inspiring young people go back to their home communities and explain how small changes can help save the forests, save the gorillas and even help save the planet.

Below are a few more pictures from this fascinating day. I hope you enjoy them!

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Planting new hope as the battle against habitat loss gains pace

 

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The biggest tree-planting project in our history is now underway!

Hi, this is Tuver!

As you can see, it’s been a few months since we updated this blog. But don’t worry, we haven’t stopped working to save gorillas. In fact, we’ve been busier than ever! As well as our usual work, we’ve been getting our hands dirty planting tens of thousands of trees, and so we’ve been spending much more time in the forests or visiting isolated villages than we have at our computers – so please accept our apologies for the lack of recent updates. We hope you understand. Here’s a little of what we have been up to…

 

It’s coming to the end of the rainy season here in DR Congo and we’ve been busy planting trees!

As some of you may know, the Gorilla Organization team here at the Goma Resource Centre recently entered into a partnership with the African Development Bank. Due to our long-standing connections with the communities here and our proven commitment to grassroots conservation and development, we were chosen to lead one of the most ambitious reforestation projects Africa has ever seen.

In all, around 500,000 trees will be planted over the next few years, most of them in the unprotected area situated between the Virunga National Park and the Kahuzi Biega National Park. This area has suffered terribly from deforestation over the past few years. As the local population keeps growing, many are chopping the trees down and using the timber for fuel and to make their homes. Worryingly, since they are so desperate due to the abject poverty of the region, many people feel they have no choice but to take the natural resources of the protected areas, destroying the precious habitat the endangered gorillas rely on for food and shelter!

This is why we have been extra-determined to get this project started as soon as possible. Over the past couple of weeks, we have been busy distributing saplings to a number of communities situated within walking distance of the Kahuzi Biega National Park.

Here you can see some pictures from our visit to villages in Kalehe Territory. Working with our Programmes Manager in the country, Henry Cirhuza, we explained to the people how planting new trees can not only save the gorilla habitat from destruction, it can also benefit them by providing them with a sustainable source of timber and firewood.

Then, with the help of our expert agronomist Bahati, we helped get the planting started! As I write this, we have already distributed tens of thousands of tree saplings. While it may take some time before we can start to reverse decades of deforestation, this is a step in the right direction!

As always, thank you for your ongoing support!

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The community came together to help save the precious gorilla habitat

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The local men were interested to hear how fast the trees can grow and how they can be used for a number of things, including firewood and timber for construction

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A whole village will now have a sustainable source of fuel and timber for generations to come – no need to worry the gorillas any more!

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Even the local children were happy to get involved with the tree planting efforts – let’s hope we have inspired some future gorilla conservationists…

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Planting thousands of new trees is hard work, but definitely worth the effort

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Families supported one another. This new green buffer of trees should mean they no longer have to trespass in the National Park for fuel

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And here’s the finished result! It may not look much now, but in a couple of years, this will be a lush forest of trees to support the local communities

 

New trees bring new hope for gorillas and people…

Hi, this is Tuver ,

Last week I was invited to a tree planting ceremony at a community in Kalehe Territory, South Kivu. The community is one of many that borders the Kahuzi Biega National Park, one of the last refuges of the endangered eastern lowland gorilla.

Like most of the small towns and villages dotted throughout this part of DR Congo, for many years now, community members have had little choice but to go into the protected forest and cut down trees. They know this illegal and they are know that the ecosystem here is fragile and must be protected at all costs. However, with near-constant war cutting them off from the rest of the country and poverty widespread, most feel they have little choice but to take the risk and enter the forest in search of food and fuel.

Almost ten years ago now, the Gorilla Organization started working with these communities, helping them plant fast-growing trees they could use for firewood. These tress serve as a valuable buffer between gorillas and their cousins in the forest.

And our efforts continue. So far, we’ve planted around 160,000 trees on the borders of Kahuzi Biega National Park, and I just recently watched a few more go into the ground.

As you can see from the pictures I took, the whole village turned out to learn about why the trees are being planted. These pictures should also give you some idea of how much forest has been lost and how we are working to address this. And let’s not forget, more trees is not just good news for gorillas needing food and shelter! It’s also good news for humans, too, as we start to feel the effects of climate change here in Africa.

The whole village turned out to hear why we were planting more trees

The whole village turned out to hear why we were planting more trees

Here are some trees we planted just a short time ago...

Here are some trees we planted just a short time ago…

But as you can see, much of the forest has been cut down to use for farming

But as you can see, much of the forest has been cut down to use for farming

And here's me, checking out the fully-grown trees that help keep the gorillas safe

And here’s me, checking out the fully-grown trees that help keep the gorillas safe

A busy, exciting June in Goma…

It was great to see the students so enthusiastic and keen to learn about conservation and how they can help gorillas

It was great to see the students so enthusiastic and keen to learn about conservation and how they can help gorillas

Every June we join communities across the planet in celebrating World Environment Day, and this year was no different.

This time around the focus was on climate change and deforestation, both issues that are of great concern here, both to the people living in the North Kivu area and the wildlife of the region, including, of course, the magnificent gorillas.

On the day itself I was lucky enough to attend a special conference at the Free University of the Great Lakes. Here, the Provincial Minister for the Environment Anselme Kitakya put forward the government’s plans to do more to protect the wonderful forests we live alongside. Plus, we also heard of the latest biodiversity and conservation projects happening elsewhere in the world thanks to speakers from other big NGOs.

But my highlight was the competition the Gorilla Organization held for students across the city of Goma. In all, we incited 64 schools across the city to take part and share their ideas on how we can best stop deforestation. A number of prizes were awarded for the most thoughtful ideas, and it was really encouraging to see these young people using their minds to think of ways we can halt the worrying loss of gorilla habitat.

The interest in the competition shows just how much Congo’s youth care about their country, including its animals. I hope that, just as our radio shows and our Wildlife Clubs have help inspire a new generation of gorilla guardians, our work in June will have done the same.

Here are some pictures from some of the events that took place on and after World Environment Day. I hope you enjoy them!

The weather may have been bad, but World Environment Day was a great success!

The weather was bad, but World Environment Day was a great success! Check out our logo on the far right of the banner!

 

Conservation professionals from many different NGOs came to learn and share their knowledge

Conservation professionals from many different NGOs came to learn and share their knowledge, which was very inspiring

Here some competition winners sit on stage and share their ideas with other students

Competition winners sit on stage and share their ideas with other students

And I was happy to share my thoughts with the local media!

And I was happy to share my thoughts with the local media!

Sadness and worry as Virungas head ranger is shot

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Hi, this is Henry,

Here in Goma, we’re used to bad news. Even the news that one of the brave rangers working to protect the Virunga National Park has been shot is something we have sadly come to expect now. After all, over the past 10 years, more than 150 rangers have been killed for just doing their jobs.

But still, the news that the head of the park, Emmanuel de Merode (above) was shot while driving back to the headquarters was greeted with great sadness and shock. Just one week ago, Emmanuel organised a really important conference where he explained his new vision for the region. His ‘Virungas Alliance’ will have the backing of both the European Union and Howard Buffet. Millions of dollars will be invested in building a new hydro-electric plant to provide power to tens of thousands of homes, and a new water system will be constructed close to the gorilla sector in order to supply local communities with clean water and reduce their reliance on the natural resources of the forest. After months and months of despair the mood was finally one of optimism – there was even talk of reopening the park to tourists!

Tourists taking pictures of one of the gorillas at the Virungas National Park

When will it be safe to welcome tourists back to see the Congo’s gorillas?

Thankfully Emmanuel has survived the attack and is doing fine. Now we have to hope that the attack won’t derail the wonderful work he has been doing over the years. We need investment in the Virungas and so we can only hope that acts of violence don’t jeopardise this.

People are so tired of all this instability here in DR Congo. We thought that, following the recent ceasefire it was time to get back to work. But as this latest tragic shooting shows, there are still serious conflicts of interest that means true peace is unlikely to come any time soon.

Gorilla missing in the mist!

Hi, this is Jean Claude,

To begin with, the entire staff and I would like to wish all of our supporters a Happy New Year from Mt. Tshiaberimu, in the DR Congo!

I was not able to write to you earlier this year as we are still working very hard on finding our lost Silverback Tsongo, from the Kipura troop. As some of you might know, he went missing around the end of November 2012 and has not been seen ever since. However, what we did find instead were about 200 snares and evidence of poaching, which sadly enough is still one of the biggest threats to gorillas’ existence.

Mwasanyinya

On one of my recent treks to find Tsongo, I came across his mate Mwasanyinya and son Mukokya (picture above) who are still in deep sorrow over the disappearance of the old silverback. It puts a strain on them, especially on the female, because the entire family is left without a leader and protector and her son Mukokya (10 yrs, picture below) is still too young to replace his father.

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Mwasanyinya’s grief over her lost mate shows how closely gorillas are related to humans as they even share similar emotions to ours. There are many studies that show that primates express themselves with facial expressions and are capable of feeling empathy and sadness. This has also shown in our latest monitoring on the female mountain gorilla as her eating habits have declined drastically since November.

It is a heartbreaking situation here at Mt. Tshiaberimu, which leaves us to hope that we will find Tsongo safe and healthy very soon. Until then we thank all of you for your ongoing support. I will write to you again soon, and hopefully with better news!

Strategy meeting in Kampala!

 

Hi, this is Tuver,

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I am currently in Kampala, the capital of Uganda, attending the annual staff strategy meeting of our organization. The purpose of this meeting is to reflect on the projects and achievements of 2013 as well as to plan new and better strategies and projects to save gorillas, for the year ahead of us.

Among the attendees we had our Chairman Ian Redmond and Executive Director Jilian Miller as well as our DR Congo Program Manager Henry, and our Program Managers Emmanuel and Sam who came in from Rwanda and Uganda (see picture above).

It is really exciting to see everybody again and to work together on our objectives for 2014. The determination by my colleges to help, not only the gorillas but also the local communities here in central Africa who suffer poverty, is amazing and makes me look forward to the New Year!

Thank you all for your ongoing support and as always I will keep you updated with the latest news on our work here in Africa.

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News from Mount Tshiaberimu!

Hello, this is Jean Claude,

I recently went to Mount Tshiaberimu, a hidden corner of the Virunga National Park in eastern DR Congo, to monitor the few remaining gorillas in the area and happened to come across the silverback Katsavara who has not shown himself or his family in a while.

Katsavara is not too keen on meeting humans and has been quite aggressive toward some of the rangers in recent encounters. I guess in a way his behaviour is understandable as he is trying to protect his family since the security situation at Mount Tshiaberimu has not been the best in years. The constant fighting between military and rebels in the area – let alone the horrible act of poaching – has not only been of great danger to the gorillas but also to our local staff, and since Katsavara only has a handful of family members left he feels even stronger about protecting them.

Lucky me, I had my colleague Odilion’s camera with me, which allowed me to take the first pictures of Katsavara in 3 years from about a 100m distance. His family was nowhere to be seen but we are glad that we at least got a glimpse of the old silverback and found him safe and healthy, and who knows maybe next time I’m lucky enough to capture a new born. Until then I hope you will enjoy the pictures I took of Katsavara!

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Keeping our gorillas safe and healthy!

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Keeping a good distance between me and my friend!

Hi, this is Tuver,

A few couple of days ago I went to track gorillas at the Kahuzi-Biega National Park, which is located in the eastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The park currently holds 9 gorilla families of which 2 are open to tourists, who are always welcome at Kahuzi-Biega as the ongoing tourism aids the conservation of the low land gorillas that live here. However, there are a couple of things we have to consider when tracking them.

Our number one priority when visiting these great apes is to keep them safe and healthy by ensuring we keep the amount of pathogens spread between humans and animals to a minimum – just in case you were wondering why I was wearing a mask! This is also the reason why I kept a certain distance from the gorilla in the picture, as I was in fact following a rule called the 7-meter tracking regulation. This rule is very important as gorillas and humans are very closely related which means the chances of them catching diseases like influenza is very likely if we get in immediate contact with each other. Unfortunately, this is not always preventable as especially baby gorillas are always curious in getting to know tourists and trackers who come to visit them.

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Eastern lowland gorilla at Kahuzi-Biega National Park

 

And now a trustee pops by Goma to say hello…

Paul meets with Henry at the Goma Resource Centre

Paul meets with DRC programmes manager Henry at the Goma Resource Centre

Hi, this is Tuver,

Just a few weeks after we had the honour of welcoming chairman Ian Redmond to this part of Africa, trustee Paul Baldwin and his wife also paid a visit, to see for themselves the work being done to protect gorillas and improve the lives of their human neighbours.

During their trip, the couple went to see mountain gorillas in the Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda – they even managed to see baby Iwacu, our adopted mountain gorilla – and they also visited a number of development projects there and in neighbouring Uganda. To finish off their mini tour of central Africa, Paul and Sarah crossed the border into DR Congo, where they visited the team here at the Goma Resource Centre.

As well as myself, the Baldwins met with Henry, the programmes manager for DR Congo, and together we discussed the current status of the programmes and how the money donated by generous supporters in the UK and elsewhere in the world is being put to good use transforming the lives of thousands of people and so easing the pressure being put on the gorillas’ forest home.

Here are a few pictures of their visit. If you’re visiting this part of Africa any time, we’d be happy to welcome you to the Resource Centre as well – just get in touch before you arrive!

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Paul and Sarah talk gorillas and field projects with Henry